Old Las Vegas Home Versus a New Home

Which Would Be The Best Choice

If you are planning to buy a Las Vegas Home, and are not sure of whether you are interested in a new home, a somewhat older resale, or a truly “older” home, it would be best to avoid confusion by researching what the differences are in older and newer homes, and how these differences would or would not be to you and your family’s liking and adaptability.

Be sure to have a family consultation after you have carefully examined these differences, in order to reach a consensus as to what kind of home would best suit everyone’s lifestyle.

Above all, try to reach some conclusions before you bring your appointed Las Vegas Real Estate Agent into the picture. Once you are focused on the kind of homes you have decided you are interested in, and in what price range, your agent can go to work and locate properties of interest.

Differences in newer and older homes are many.  For example, older homes –in particular, homes  built in the 1950s thru the  1970s –  may offer less interior living space then a newer home ( a typical two or three bedroom home in those days might be about 900 to 1600 square feet, with one or one-and-one half bathrooms)  but may have been built on a larger lot since land was not quite at such a premium then.

Rooms and windows are generally smaller in these older homes, and each of the rooms are pretty much closed off from one another. The open floor plan of modern construction allows for lighter, airier surroundings, and larger windows will let in more daylight.

Rewiring might be a distinct necessity for some older homes, which may not be able to accommodate all of the high end kitchen appliances and electronic equipment that are in every day use today.

Additionally, the cost of a code upgrade or remodeling of an older home should be taken into consideration as well. On the other hand, an older homes mature landscaping, with towering trees and abundant shrubbery, are a definite plus factor, since landscaping today can be an expensive proposition, and trees and shrubs can take years to reach full size and maturity.

Due to lesser square footage, the older home lacks the equivalent storage space available in newer construction.

However, the quality construction found in many older homes is often better than on many comparable newer Las Vegas Homes. These homes were built to last, with sturdy 2×6 redwood framing and solid plaster walls in place of sheetrock.

Many vintage homes, such as those built in the 1920s and 30s, have architectural features that give these homes a “character” that is appealing to many people. Many of these vintage homes are located closer to downtown areas, which can make them quite expensive to own.

So, the conclusion seems to be that whether to buy a new or older home is pretty much a judgment call, and your decision should be based on many factors, and especially how well a particular home, old or new, fits in with your expectations of what an ideal place to call home should be.

If you are interested in purchasing a “resale”  or new home in Las Vegas and have any questions about the Las Vegas Market or would like to set up a time to view properties, feel free to give us a call at 702.376.0088 or fill out the form below or to the right.